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Assigning Code to a Control to Respond to an Event in VB6

To cause a control to react in a certain way to user or system activity, you must put code in the appropriate event procedure of the control. The VB IDE automatically provides event procedure stubs for a control as soon as you define an instance of a control by placing its icon on the form designer surface.

NOTE: Events Versus Event Procedures You will often hear VB programmers loosely refer to writing code in "events." Technically, this is not correct. You don't write code in events; you write code in event procedures.

When you double-click the control instance, you call up a Code Window for one of the control's event procedures, as seen in Figure 3.15. Which event procedure you see first depends on one of two possibilities:

Editing an event procedure in the Code window
FIGURE 3.15 - Editing an event procedure in the Code window

  • If you haven't yet done anything with the control's event procedures, you first see the user interface Default event procedure, that is, the procedure for the event that's considered to be the most important event for the control.
  • If you've already written some event procedure code, then you call up the first event procedure in alphabetical order for which you've already provided some code.

The default event procedures for the three most basic controls are:

  • The Click event for the CommandButton.
  • The Change event for the TextBox.
  • The Click event for the Label control.

It's a very good idea to hold off writing any event procedure code until you've re-named all controls appropriately. We discuss this idea further in the following section.

NOTE: Events Versus Event Procedures You will often hear VB programmers loosely refer to writing code in "events." Technically, this is not correct. You don't write code in events; you write code in event procedures.


  

 

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